Thursday, May 10, 2012

Spider-Man Interviews Spider-Man

Vman has posted a cool interview in which the original cinematic Spider-Man Tobey Maguire interviews the new kid Andrew Garfield, where they chat about everything web related (we cannot wait for the Hulk one).

The full interview is below with a new TV spot for Mark Webb's 'The Amazing Spider-Man:'
TOBEY MAGUIRE You're in New york for Death of a Salesman, right?

ANDREW GARFIELD Yeah, that's right.

TM I love that you're doing that. and you're enjoying the play, the experience?
"Enjoying" is a strange word for that play. How has it been playing Biff?

AG [Laughs] Of course going through this kind of release and catharsis, facing all your demons in a space of three hours every night—it can be incredibly rewarding. It's invigo- rating. It's a great challenge, a great test and opportunity. There's something very pure about it. There are no frills and there's nowhere to hide and you have to be vulnerable as hell, and you have to serve something much greater than yourself, which is this incred- ible work of art that you're trying to bring to life. It's a wonderful, lucky opportunity for any actor to have. But, yeah, the majority of the time I wake up in the morning I'm kind of confused as to why I decided to do it. [Laughs] But you have to heave yourself up!

TM And do you feel—I don't want to say confined or imply any negativity— but the schedule of a broadway show can be long and hard, portraying a character day after day.

AG I think this is enough to be contending with right now. The only other thing that's been preying on my mind is the impending release of this movie I've done, and that is much more stressful than being on stage every night.

TM [Laughs] Would that be the release of The Amazing Spider-Man?!

AG That's the one! Do you know about this movie? [Laughs]

TM I do know about it! actually, when it was coming together, I was particularly excited at two moments: one was when [director] Marc Webb got involved. I think he's an interesting and cool choice. and then I was certainly curious as to who was going to play Peter Parker. When I heard it was you, I was literally like, Fucking perfect!

AG Oh, man!

TM I just want it to be great, and I thought, What a great actor andrew is, i'm glad that's what's happening here.

AG That's so nice of you.

TM What was the process? How did you end up being the guy?

AG It was pretty basic, apart from it being more dragged out and pressure-filled and dra- matic than any other audition process I've ever been through. They like to put you through the ringer, in the respect that it creates drama and tension among a generation of actors.

TM [Laughs]

AG And they succeed every time, it seems. But, no, it was great. I'm friends with a few of the guys who were up for it, and I actually had dinner with Jamie [Bell] the night of my screen test and his screen test. We compared notes and war stories, and we kind of got past the ridiculousness of it all and thought it would be a nice idea to get everyone together and kind of interview each other about how messed up the process is, being against each other, and remember that we're all in it together, knowing that when you take off that bodysuit someone else is going to be stepping into your sweat immediately after. It's a weird kind of cattle call. But Marc [Webb] was great. He was very open and encouraging. You have the monitoring area with literally about 30 people judging you, looking at your face and whispering to each other—it's one of the most disconcerting and kind of humiliating things to go through, if you're aware of it, you know what I mean?

TM Yeah, I completely understand. What kind of effect has this had on you?

AG The main thing I'm thinking about and worrying about is what happens after this movie comes out. What was your experience when you became Spider-Man in people's eyes? I'm interested to hear what you have to say about the whole life change that it brings. Because right now I have a host of fears that I'm contending with on a minute-to-minute basis. I'm not in the reality of it yet, so I'm sure I'm imagining it will be much worse than it is. I admire you so much because you're an actor and that's all you've ever been and all you ever will be. It must be very hard to hold on to the simple fact of wanting to be an actor, to tell stories and not have your image become bigger than your art. Do you have a recollection of a definite change, or was it a seamless thing?

TM I think our thing was a little bit different because movies hadn't been doing the sort of opening-weekend business that's fairly common—even expected—today. The first Harry Potter came out about six months before us and it was this phenom- enon from Day one. it was so wild because it was a new thing at that moment—and i'm not saying that hasn't happened in movie history, but at the time that was a big jump. and then that happened with us. People didn't anticipate [2002's Spider- Man] to be like that. Leading up to it you start to get reactions and people tell you, you know, what the tracking is and what range your opening weekend box office is likely to be. but for me it was kind of unexpected. So much shifted in my life the weekend the movie came out. it was shocking.

AG Oh wow, that's crazy.
TV Spot

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